Tuesday, November 07, 2017

The Wrath of the Ancients by Catherine Cavendish - Book Review

Yesterday Catherine Cavendish kindly visited my blog with an interesting, though chilling, article about the White Lady of Hoffburg. It's here if you'd like to read it.

Catherine's article was fine tie-in with her new book "The Wrath of the Ancients" (see here on Amazon) which starts out in Egypt in the early 20th century and then moves to Vienna.


Here's the blurb:

DESTINY IN DEATH
 
Egypt, 1908
 
Eminent archeologist Dr. Emeryk Quintillus has unearthed the burial chamber of Cleopatra. But this tomb raider’s obsession with the Queen of the Nile has nothing to do with preserving history. Stealing sacred and priceless relics, he murders his expedition crew, and flees—escaping the quake that swallows the site beneath the desert sands . . .
 
Vienna, 1913
 
Young widow Adeline Ogilvy has accepted employment at the mansion of Dr. Quintillus, transcribing the late professor’s memoirs. Within the pages of his journals, she discovers the ravings of a madman convinced he possessed the ability to reincarnate Cleopatra. Within the walls of his home, she is assailed by unexplained phenomena: strange sounds, shadowy figures, and apparitions of hieroglyphics.
 
Something pursued Dr. Quintillus from Egypt. Something dark, something hungry. Something tied to the fate and future of Adeline Ogilvy . . .



And here's my review:

I’ve read and enjoyed all of Catherine Cavendish’s books, most of which give the reader at least a glimpse of history. In “Wrath of the Ancients” she goes much further back, giving us a tale of Cleopatra and her burial tomb.

Dr. Emeryk Quintillus has discovered the tomb, thus achieving his dream of finding his one true love – Cleopatra. He steals dust from her body and also a golden statue of the God Set who was said to protect her. Quintillus murders all those involved in the discovery – not a nice man.

Early 20th century Vienna and a young widow, Adeline, is hired to type up Quintillus’s manuscripts, the content of which horrifies her, as do the strange sounds emanating from the basement of the old house, which, of course, she does have to investigate…

Written in the genteel style of the period, the horror that is building within is far from genteel – a horror that will kill many of those who come in contact with it in the cruelest way.

The Wrath of the Ancients is a horror story of the purest kind and I applaud Ms Cavendish’s brilliant plotting that leads the reader to the petrifying ending that can never be guessed at. Every character in her novel comes alive in the reader’s mind (even the ones you’d rather not) and her sense of place is perfect – I could see myself having a mélange with Adeline in Vienna. With every book she writes, Ms Cavendish becomes ever more adept at the horror genre. I thoroughly recommend this book.

Buy links: Wrath Of The Ancients


Connect with Cat :                  Catherine Cavendish